_a Detroit_2Green Garage_Detroit_Green Garage_comp 2In the middle of Detroit there’s a place that makes you think about the true nature of work today. Specifically, how should society address job creation and greater opportunities for all?

The Green Garage offers some practical and sustainable responses to the economic and political turmoil we face in our overdue and perilous transition beyond industrial era “jobs for life.”

Twentieth century so-called “lifetime” jobs were often monotonous, confining and exhausting. People were left with scarce energy and creativity for working beyond retirement age. Whether displaced as a result of trade agreements or advanced robotics, layoffs and plant closures threatened workers throughout their careers. Employment insurance was supposed to take care of gaps, but this whole approach to work was economically and personally unsustainable.

In contrast to the current rise of revitalizing “green jobs,” Diego Rivera depicted robotic, lifeless “grey jobs” in this fresco panel:

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Detail from Detroit Industry Murals by Diego Rivera at the Detroit Institute of Arts, 1932-33 

When Green Garage founders Peggy and Tom Brennan talk about “a more sustainable way to work” they think in terms of a full spectrum of eco-friendly and economically-healthy contributors. Every aspect of their physical working space serves to advance triple-bottom-line green practices. In addition, a wealth of sustainable approaches to lifelong employability are emerging from this former Model T showroom.

Employment today depends heavily on three factors: first, our reputation as active contributors; second, our capacity to make healthy human connections; and third, our appetite for continuous learning. The Green Garage provides a physical and mental environment that grows these three ingredients of sustainable work in the 21st century.

The Brennans see the advantages of a natural approach to working through ideas for each fledgling business, rather than the more common, accelerated mechanical, capital risk-heavy start-up model.

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Jane Jacobs’ writing on grassroots change was a major influence when launching this venture.

Green Garage participants are brought together by shared values. For example, Detroit Food Academy works with local educators, chefs, and business owners to inspire Detroiters ages 13-24 to develop entrepreneurial ventures rooted in food. These ventures include guiding artisan food projects from early stages of development to market. “Students learn by transforming their ideas into reality. Through this process, they grow as holistic leaders who are healthy, connected…” which they explain has the power to improve the local food system. These experiences “open doors, create connections, and spark confidence” which ultimately leads to more resilient workers.

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Detroit Food Academy co-founder Noam Kimelman talks with international visitors eager to learn about DFA’s approach to engaging youth in job creation and discovery.

Detroit Food Academy also stands in marked contrast to the economic monoculture which thrived spectacularly in Detroit for only a few decades. Relying on a single industry led to dependent and vulnerable workforce. Instead, DFA’s green job enterprises are diverse and committed to long term well-being.

As I described in a previous post, we can learn a lot about the new nature of work from such leading examples.

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Edible greens and flowers grown on the Green Garage roof are consumed by patrons of such local businesses as Motor City Brewing Works.

Detroit_Green Garage_1-Sharon VanderKaay