Search

VanderPalette

facilitator / artist

Category

Uncategorized

Learning from experience is an art

Most of what we need to know about life is learned through experience.

Artists develop the habit of standing back from their work to study it from different viewpoints. Likewise, we gain fresh perspective on life by standing back to view our experiences.

The artist’s palette can be seen as a symbol of blended elements and unscripted possibilities. Artists develop their strengths through a blend of practice, experiment and observation.

In addition to acquiring technical skills, artists “feel their way” forward by “sizing up” situations and “figuring out” what to do next. Solutions emerge through a process of trial and error: this works, that didn’t work so well.

Artists tend to be lifelong learners. Lifelong learning is about continuing to grow as a person, in addition to acquiring technical skills. This pursuit requires both formal and informal learning.

Formal learning is best for conveying technical knowledge, when we must depend on instructors to tell us what matters most and what we need to know.

By contrast, human skills are best absorbed informally through experience. Informal learning is an organic, natural way to grow—which is generally how artists develop their talents. Artists are purpose-driven. They formally acquire some technical skills, then learn by doing. They see their whole world as offering potential takeaways.

Making the most of day-to-day learning opportunities is a crucial skill for the future. This involves being guided by purpose, learning in action and discovering our own takeaways. Social learning clubs can show us how to see more lessons in everyday life.

-Sharon VanderKaay

photo: Boston Public Library, sculptor: Bela Lyon Pratt, 1912

The artists’ view

Artists are taught to observe things as they are, and to imagine what might be.

They learn to see more possibilities, more options, another way to do it.

Unlike professions rooted in precedent (law), generally accepted principles (accounting) or evidence (medicine), artists can’t rely on “proof” to guide their daily decisions. So they must get better at sizing up situations and sensing what to do.

The future will require less constricted thinking, seeing a better way, questioning options. The artists’ view encompasses these questions:

  • What do I ultimately want to achieve?
  • What’s really going on here?
  • Why is this happening?
  • What questions should we be asking?
  • What other options are there?

-Sharon VanderKaay

Lifelong social learning

It’s time to question our assumptions about “lifelong learning.” What does the term mean? What could it mean?

Assorted doses of training over a 50+/- year career will not be enough to thrive in the future. Rather than default to a vision of instructor-led courses aimed at fixing every gap in what we need to know, we can pursue a sustainable diet that feeds our daily development as a whole person.

Lifelong learners should also be aware that “Top 10 People Skills for 2024” lists are misleading. Complex humans should see themselves as holistic beings, not an assembly of parts and specifications. Our social skills are integrated and inseparable; we are not fleshy robots.

For instance, negotiation skills require every one of the skills typically found on Top 10 lists. And why is “problem solving” on these lists, but not “problem preventing”? What year will “wise reasoning” suddenly appear as a hot skill? Hopefully before it’s too late to save ourselves.

In real life, ego development and cultivating the habit of extracting more learning from everyday experience is what matters. It’s about lifelong growth as a person, not skills checklists.      

Social learning clubs (or circles) are a model for self-reliant, lifelong development. They offer a supportive, inclusive home base where anyone can practice mining for nuggets of wisdom from their own everyday interactions. In contrast to doses of instructor-led training, social learning clubs foster a spirit of curiosity and caring about how other people see things. In other words, they are an antidote for the wide range of self-esteem issues–the ego-centric, ego-maniac and the weak ego-driven sources of havoc–that waste our time and starve our brain cells.  

Above quote: David Brooks, The New York Times, “This is How Scandinavia Got Great: The power of educating the whole person” (paywall) https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/13/opinion/scandinavia-education.html

and re-posted here.

Big learning from micro-situations

cerithwynevans

How can we gain more life experience from our everyday encounters?

Learning how to learn in action is an essential meta-skill for the future.

Mind the Say–Do Gap

Knowing what we ought to do in difficult situations isn’t enough to change what we actually do. Defaulting to old habits is normal. Finding ourselves in these predicaments, it’s not unusual for there to be a Say–Do Gap between good intentions and our actions.

Best practices and theories about people skills might make us smarter, but that’s not enough to change ingrained patterns of behaviour. If we want to continuously develop our communication and collaboration capabilities, we’ll need more than knowledge. We need to regroove our neural pathways.

REGROOVE_1_vanderpalette

As Jerry Sternin has observed, “It’s easier to act your way into a new way of thinking, than to think your way into a new way of acting.”

Stepping back to observe how we wrestle with slice-of-life situations gives us a fresh view of how we make hundreds of day-to-day decisions. Noticing more details and possibilities for moving forward, we become more empathetic, and confident in our judgment. We make real progress in narrowing our Say–Do Gap.

When thinking about social learning clubs, it’s helpful to understand the benefits of learning in action by wrestling with micro-situations.

-Sharon VanderKaay

 

 

 

Why social learning clubs?

The Alternative UK @AlterUK21 is a platform for imagining what civil society can be. We share a belief in the need for lifelong learning models that advance this purpose on a day-to-day basis. Read their recent editorial on the potential for Social Learning Clubs here.

screen shot 2019-01-28 at 10.38.31 am

Social learning clubs in 3 bites

Below are links to three short stories on how to prepare for the future of work:

A Simple Path to Upgrade Human Skills

screen shot 2019-01-28 at 10.37.57 am

The Problem with Problem-solving

screen shot 2019-01-28 at 10.37.33 am

The World Needs More Detectives

screen shot 2019-01-28 at 10.36.50 am

The tight-loose alternative

tight loose graphicTight or loose management – which way should firms respond when projects are not meeting their objectives? Should we clamp down to achieve better results? 

These are the wrong questions…old school questions.

Instead of a tight or loose?* we should be asking: Which aspects of our business require us to adhere to rules, and where do we need room to move within boundaries?

To begin this conversation, let’s think about the true nature of work today (along with how we need to respond):

  • Work is unpredictable (so we need to create a flexible way forward)
  • Work involves messy human relationships (so we must nurture cooperative interactions)
  • Work depends on discretionary effort (so it’s vital to understand what motivates people to do their best work)
  • There’s a yearning for meaningful work (so should define the firm’s purpose, as well as each project’s purpose beyond meeting schedule, budget and scope)

When we apply tight management to the wrong aspects of business, we stifle initiative and potential. Likewise, the misapplication of loose management results in wasted time and effort. “Loose” does not mean sloppy, haphazard and uncaring. In any case, striving for a uniformly tight mechanical system of management goes against human nature and leads to endless frustration.

Let the conversation begin! Which aspects of your business are tight-appropriate and in what ways do you need more room to move?

– Sharon VanderKaay

* I first encountered the concept of tight/loose management in Tom Peters’ and Robert H. Waterman Jr. 1982 book, In Search of Excellence – and yet we still wrestle with this issue.

 

Move upstream: interview your clients

London move upstream_cheese grater

Most clients don’t really know how to evaluate design firms. Also, due to the large sums of money they are spending on projects, they’re scared of being blamed for making a bad choice.

Imagine how you might apply empathy to this tense situation. Rather than react to every onerous RFP, why not meet with potential clients well in advance of the selection process? Why not ask if they want your help in writing the RFP? Your inside knowledge can help them avoid pitfalls.

Interview your clients

Instead of talking about your work for most of that intro meeting (Me! Me! Me!…oh right, you), what if you used this time to understand where they’re coming from (You! You! Me!).

Yes, we should bring our portfolio and be ready to tell a story that demonstrates our depth of knowledge. Yes we should focus on a relevant example that paints a picture of what it’s like to work with us. But we can enrich relationships and gain an edge by interviewing our clients. Maybe we can help shape the content of the RFP and be the proverbial firm with the inside track. I have been in this advisory/winning position several times, so I know it can be done.

Empathy-driven questions for a client might include:

1.  What are your biggest challenges?

2.  What do you look for when choosing a design consultant?

3.  What problems do you seek to avoid?

4.  Do you have any dissatisfactions with your current RFP process?

5.  How important is the fee in your selection?

-Sharon VanderKaay

Places people want to be

Kerrytown

Kerrytown in Ann Arbor is a place people want to be. What can planners and developers learn from this example?

Architects tend to talk vaguely about design quality and excellence. This can lead to disappointment when bland places get built that nobody cares about.

_mall
Places people don’t want to be have economic and mental health costs.

We need to be more specific when discussing all the the intended functions of a space. “Function” includes technical specifications and program requirements, but also a purpose. The ultimate purpose of most building projects is to attract people: shoppers, diners, employees and others who will deliver ROI (return on investment) to the owners.

Boring, generic places risk becoming financial failures.

Developers and even the most cold-blooded business investor can avoid unnecessary risk by asking one simple question when making design decisions: “Are we building a place where people want to be?”

The answer to this basic question requires awareness of the kinds of places people don’t want to be, as well as analyzing places they barely tolerate out of necessity.

Why do people love Kerrytown?  Five factors are evident there:

  1. Human scale (not overwhelming, or making people feel insignificant)
  2. Distinctive character (unique identity that people can relate to emotionally)
  3. Flexible seating and overflowing activities (an organic sense of abundance)
  4. Nature and the human touch (such as art, texture and living things)
  5. Elements of surprise, whimsy, quirkiness that indicate people care (vs.”mean”)

These five elements add up to a wise business decision. When architects say, “business investors don’t appreciate good design” they are really saying “decision makers don’t recognize elements that contribute to places people want to be.” It’s not enough for designers to talk about excellence and quality.

image
In front of Union Station in Toronto is a place people want to be.

Risk or Reward copy

Med Sci U of T
Is this a place people want to be?

-Sharon VanderKaay

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑