Boston Public Library_palette lady_crop

Most of what we need to know about life is learned through experience.

Artists develop the habit of standing back from their work to study it from different viewpoints. Likewise, we gain fresh perspective on life by standing back to view our experiences.

The artist’s palette can be seen as a symbol of blended elements and unscripted possibilities. Artists develop their strengths through a blend of practice, experiment and observation.

In addition to acquiring technical skills, artists “feel their way” forward by “sizing up” situations and “figuring out” what to do next. Solutions emerge through a process of trial and error: this works, that didn’t work so well.

Artists tend to be lifelong learners. Lifelong learning is about continuing to grow as a person, in addition to acquiring technical skills. This pursuit requires both formal and informal learning.

Formal learning is best for conveying technical knowledge, when we must depend on instructors to tell us what matters most and what we need to know.

By contrast, human skills are best absorbed informally through experience. Informal learning is an organic, natural way to grow—which is generally how artists develop their talents. Artists are purpose-driven. They formally acquire some technical skills, then learn by doing. They see their whole world as offering potential takeaways.

Making the most of day-to-day learning opportunities is a crucial skill for the future. This involves being guided by purpose, learning in action and discovering our own takeaways. Social learning clubs can show us how to see more lessons in everyday life.

-Sharon VanderKaay

photo: Boston Public Library, sculptor: Bela Lyon Pratt, 1912